|||||||||||Developers Hammerson kept the charnel house on view to the public after the building was complete|Ahead of work on Allen & Overy’s offices in Spital Square a charnel, or bone storage, house was found|The well-preserved south tower structure meant a delay to the project and increased costs|Developers knew the remains of Bermondsey Abbey were below the Bermondsey Square development|The Spital Square development was built on the site of the well-documented St Mary Spital complex|The St Mary Spital complex included an Augustinian priory, an infirmary, a church and a cemetery|Along with the south tower of Bermondsey Abbey, parts of a Tudor mansion were found before work began|The south tower of Bermondsey Abbey, part of which is now on display at the Del’Aziz eatery|Archaeology costs added £2m to the price of the Bermondsey Square project before lost rent was factored in|The public can even go into the 14th-century charnel house itself on Open House Day in London||
16 Feb 2011

Archaeology in London: What lies beneath

Words by Michael Willoughby

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