|||||||||Mezzanines and partitions carve out intimate areas|De Waal’s studio was converted from an old munitions warehouse|A vitrine, full of de Waal’s ceramics, is sunk into the floor|The upstairs library, a complement to the practical function of the spaces for making|A vitrine, full of de Waal’s ceramics, is sunk into the floor|The glazing area and kiln room occupy one end of the space|A communal dining area in front of the kitchenette|Steel roof trusses and a concrete floor retain the building’s industrial character||
02 Feb 2015

Edmund de Waal’s London studio by DSDHA

Words by Grant Gibson

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