|||||||||The restored exterior of the 1920s building, with its tall, arched windows and terra cotta detailing|Two cantilevered floor plates fill the cathedral-like space and provide room for Cannon’s 120 employees|Concrete floors and industrial-style lighting honour the building’s original use, and vast windows let in ample natural light|The floorplates were overlapped to give the impression that they almost hover in space, and to allow as much light as possible to penetrate informal meeting areas|The area between the newly formed workspace and the external wall of the original building is now used as a community gallery|Adapted Knoll workstations are set up in a grid formation among the building’s original steel columns|A reference library at lower- ground level contasts steel and brick with carpeting and bright yellow bookcases|An oblong structure on the roof originally used to store conveyor equipment now houses the staff lunchroom and boardroom||

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Workplace | Design | Architecture