|||||||||A huge portrait of founder Leo Burnett dominates the entrance|Who needs a trophy cabinet when you’ve got a wheelbarrow? Industry awards are unconventionally displayed|Hotdesk areas are light and bright, in contrast to moodily lit meeting rooms|Staff have their own personalised apple, exhibited in the breakout space|Meeting rooms at the building’s centre are accessed by a dark corridor punctuated by porthole windows|Meeting rooms are drenched in green, Leo Burnett’s corporate colour|The company’s vaunted ‘7+’ standard is represented in the form of an anamorphic art installation|The concrete screed floor hints at the building’s former life as a shophouse||
20 Jan 2010

Leo Burnett HQ by Ministry of Design

Words by James McLachlan

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