|||||||||||The brick and glass facade of Romero House fits into the context of Westminster Bridge Road|A half-level shift between the two sides of the building is visible from the south side of the atrium, while a wall of glass bricks makes a feature of the central stair|Breakout areas and tea points next to the atrium provide congregational space on each floor|Openable windows and a 50 per cent solid-to-glaze ratio on office floors provide good levels of daylight and natural ventilation to staff|The back staircase is nestled inside the glazed point of Romero House, pointing toward Waterloo|Skylights at the top of the atrium flood light into the centre of the building and into the peripheral areas on the office floors|The structure’s concrete frame was painted white to reflect light and maintain a simple, clean aesthetic|A top-floor pavilion with sliding glass doors leads out to a roof terrace, which has sweeping views across London|Romero House sits next door to St George’s Cathedral in Southwark|Zinc-clad tiles and solar louvres on the back elevation||
13 Sep 2010

CAFOD’s Romero House by Black Architecture

Words by Elizabeth Choppin

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